The Copyright Alert System Now Being Rolled Out at Major ISPs

The Copyright Alert System Now Being Rolled Out at Major ISPs

In the next two months, AT&T, Time Warner, Verizon and Comcast will implement the The Copyright Alert System program developed by The Center for Copyright Information. Of course, The Center for Copyright Information is a RIAA and MPPA front. The monitoring system that will be used will rely on the MarkMonitor service that has been in place for a numbers of years now. The “monitors” will be The Center for Copyright Information, i.e., RIAA and MPAA. Once again, these entities have been monitoring bitTorrent traffic for years. Indeed, a recently presented Security Research Paper concludes that you can expect to be tracked within 3 hours of firing up a torrent client.

The primary change is that in lieu of direct legal action(which can be frictional), the RIAA/MPAA, using the aforementioned ISPs as agents, can now engage in a relatively frictionless enforcement operation. And this is where the data analytics begin to kick in. Large-scale users will still be subject to the same modis operandi legal action but the voluminous data that has been collected over the years by the likes of MarkMonitor will now be used as a queryable data repository against which the new data will be used–according to whatever algorithm employed–to trigger the Copyright Alert Notifications to end users via that user’s ISP(serving an agency role of a Sheriff, more or less).

Evasion tactics? Well forget about things like Tor. Tor works over the tcp protocol(and can’t handle the load of p2p file sharing to begin with). bitTorrent these days works over udp. Sophisticated encryption techniques like mse/pe to me are more about thwarting ISP throttling, but in this case it is not the ISPs who are the monitoring agent. The best evasion technique is to use a udp proxy. But I imagine that a reliable service with tolerable speed is going to cost money which begs the question a bit of why not simply spend the money on a paid download music service. That was basically my decision around 6 years ago when the opportunity costs of evasion(when the monitoring really began to pick up) well exceeded the monthly subscription cost of a paid service.

Of course, the Copyright Alert System is just harbinger of things to come. These types of arrangements up and down the IT stack will increase by orders of magnitude under the formal adoption of whatever “cybersecurity act” that eventually passes(once again, because the basic top-level rules will be enacted via fiat, i.e, executive decision, the subsequent proposal and adoption of a legislative act is an absolute certainty). And this, of course, just exposes the silliness of the “network neutrality debate” because “network traffic” should always be understood to mean “authorized network traffic.” The arbitration between “authorized” and “unauthorized” traffic will be subject to the most relentless data analytics imaginable.

I will also offer a brief comment on unjustified triumphalism that thinks these issues can be magically skirted around. This belief is based on a fundamental mischaracterization of the internet as a horizontal, decentralized type of network. But it is not that. Rather, the internet is a type of scale-free, small network that follows a power law distribution. The network properties of scale-free invariance is much a product of quite a bit of centralized coordination. Simply, it is a mistake to think that technology alone can overcome the problem of political economy. Instead a necessary condition to be able to “route around the damage” is jurisdictional differentiation in political economy. I’ve been harping this point for a couple of years in my posts about Wikileaks. If the jurisdictional differentiation melts away then feel free to proceed straight to the outright pessimism of Evgeny Morozov and Richard Stallman who have given up on the anarchic promise of the internet. The alternative is a platform that turns out to be very well suited for tight control by Corporation and State. The evidence for this latter pessimism is the degree of rent-seeking in data analytics this little platform of ours affords(which makes the actions of State agency very much “rational” and hardly stupid in this space). The game is up when the cyber-security and “data czars” come rolling down the pike.

Finally, The Copyright Alert System is once again immediate evidence of a “Commercialist” anomaly with regard to political economic agency. Methodological individualism is hard pressed to explain ISPs acting as a Sheriff Agency (on behalf of the RIAA/MPAA) against their own customers. The model of The Firm, however, explains it quite well.

3 thoughts on “The Copyright Alert System Now Being Rolled Out at Major ISPs

  1. ISP’s are mostly owned by the same conglomerates that own the major media outlets, recording studios, and movie companies.

    Plus all of these companies also offer cable packages, of which copyright infringement pulls into. Why get a bunch of premium channels when you can torrent all the odd movies/ shows that you care to see. Or why get cable at all?

    1. thanx for the comment…

      (1) in some cases; in some cases, not
      (2) yes, many in the “not” category nonetheless are a cable and/or “streaming”provider

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